9 10, 2017

DNF Round Up

By | Monday, October 9, 2017|15 Comments

Well, its that time again. Time for me to tell you all about the books lately that didn’t make the cut. All of these books got DNF’d because I wasn’t enjoying the reading. It’s unfortunate, but it does happen. My apologies to the authors and publishers in advance.   DNF at 43% – […]

12 05, 2017

Review: FINDER’S KEEPERS and END OF WATCH by Stephen King

By | Friday, May 12, 2017|8 Comments

After reading MR.MERCEDES I knew I would have to finish this series. Stephen King is one of my favorite authors and his delve into police procedural is pretty fucking fantastic. Bill Hodges is a perfectly flawed hero and I grew to really love him. In FINDER’S KEEPERS we meet a kid named Pete […]

19 09, 2016

Review: ONLY DAUGHTER by Anna Snoekstra

By | Monday, September 19, 2016|6 Comments

Review: ONLY DAUGHTER by Anna SnoekstraOnly Daughter by Anna Snoekstra
Published by Mira Books on October 1st 2016
Pages: 400
Genres: Fiction, Thrillers, Psychological, Suspense, Crime, General
ARC provided by BEA 2016, Harlequin

AmazonBook Depository

In this chilling psychological thriller, one woman's dark past becomes another's deadly future 
In 2003, sixteen-year-old Rebecca Winter disappeared.  
She'd been enjoying her summer break: working at a fast-food restaurant, crushing on an older boy and shoplifting with her best friend. Mysteriously ominous things began to happen—a presence in her room at night, periods of blackouts, a feeling of being watched—though Bec remained oblivious of what was to come.  
Eleven years later she is replaced. 
A young woman, desperate after being arrested, claims to be the decade-missing Bec.  
Soon the impostor is living Bec's life. Sleeping in her bed. Hugging her mother and father. Learning her best friends' names. Playing with her little brothers. 
But Bec's welcoming family and enthusiastic friends are not quite as they seem. As the impostor dodges the detective investigating her case, she begins to delve into the life of the real Bec Winter—and soon realizes that whoever took Bec is still at large, and that she is in imminent danger.

I wasn’t sure about this book. The main character was wholly unlikable for me until about almost half way through the story. The main character is telling a major lie, she pretends to be a girl who went missing 11 years ago. The thing that kills me about this story is that there […]

29 08, 2016

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas Mullen

By | Monday, August 29, 2016|12 Comments

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas MullenDarktown by Thomas Mullen
Published by Simon and Schuster on September 13th 2016
Pages: 384
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, Thrillers, Crime, African American
ARC provided by BEA 2016, Simon & Schuster

AmazonBook Depository

In the tradition of our most acclaimed suspense writers, the author of The Last Town on Earth delivers a riveting and elegant police procedural set in Atlanta, a ripped-from-the-headlines depiction of a world on the cusp of great change involving race relations, city politics, and police corruption.

Responding from pressure on high, the Atlanta police department is forced to hire its first black officers in 1948. The newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers and their authority is limited: They can’t arrest white suspects; they can’t drive a squad car; they can’t even use the police headquarters and must instead operate out of the basement of a gym.

When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man turns up fatally beaten, no one seems to care except for Boggs and Smith, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds. Pressured from all sides, they will risk their jobs, the trust the community has put in them, and even their own safety to investigate her death. Their efforts bring them up against an old-school cop, Dunlow, who has long run the neighborhood like his own, and Dunlow’s young partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines.

Set in the post-war, pre-civil rights South, and evoking the socially resonant and morally complex crime novels of Dennis Lehane, and Walter Mosley, Darktown is a vivid, smart, intricately plotted crime saga that explores the timely issues of race, law enforcement, and the uneven scales of justice.

This is such a moving piece of fictionalized American history. In 1948 the first black officers are hired in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Racial tensions are still very high and although the city appoints these officers to patrol over their own streets they have very little power; no patrol cars (no radios […]

28 08, 2015

THE DROWNED BOY by Karin Fossum

By | Friday, August 28, 2015|2 Comments

THE DROWNED BOY by Karin FossumThe Drowned Boy by Karin Fossum
Series: Inspector Konrad Sejer #11
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on August 25th, 2015
Pages: 240
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, International Mystery & Crime, Thrillers, Crime
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via Edelweiss

AmazonB&NAudibleBook Depository

A new addition to the captivating Inspector Sejer series, the first sinceThe Caller, from Norway's finest crime writer
Carmen and Nicolai failed to resuscitate their son, Tommy, after finding him floating in their backyard pond. When Inspector Skarre arrives on the scene, Carmen reports that Tommy, a healthy toddler with Down syndrome, wandered into the garden while Nicolai was working in the basement and she was cleaning the house. Skarre senses something is off with Carmen's story and consults his trusted colleague, the famed Inspector Sejer. An autopsy reveals Tommy's lungs to be full of soap.
When Sejer and Skarre revisit the couple, Carmen, an epileptic, changes her story, confessing that she'd been knocked unconscious by a seizure while bathing Tommy. When she came to, she found him drowned in the tub and, horrified and frightened, threw him into the pond.
But Skarre and Sejer's doubt is not appeased and the case is reopened. What more could Carmen be hiding? And what lengths will she take to cover her guilt? As Carmen's own family starts to doubt her, Skarre and Sejer work to find the truth.

This story is a bit sad. The prologue tried to put me in a funk as it describes what it is like for someone to drown. The Drowned Boy had some really unlikable characters and a few good guys. This book had me really just hoping for justice for little Tommy. The synopsis […]

1 08, 2015

TRUST NO ONE by Paul Cleave

By | Saturday, August 1, 2015|10 Comments

TRUST NO ONE by Paul CleaveTrust No One by Paul Cleave
Published by Atria Books on August 4th 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Fiction, Thrillers, General, Mystery & Detective, Crime
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via NetGalley

AmazonB&NAudibleBook Depository

In the exciting new psychological thriller by the Edgar-nominated author of Joe Victim, a famous crime writer struggles to differentiate between his own reality and the frightening plot lines he’s created for the page.

Jerry Grey is known to most of the world by his crime writing pseudonym, Henry Cutter—a name that has been keeping readers at the edge of their seats for more than a decade. Recently diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s at the age of forty-nine, Jerry’s crime writing days are coming to an end. His twelve books tell stories of brutal murders committed by bad men, of a world out of balance, of victims finding the darkest forms of justice. As his dementia begins to break down the wall between his life and the lives of the characters he has created, Jerry confesses his worst secret: The stories are real. He knows this because he committed the crimes. Those close to him, including the nurses at the care home where he now lives, insist that it is all in his head, that his memory is being toyed with and manipulated by his unfortunate disease. But if that were true, then why are so many bad things happening? Why are people dying?

Hailed by critics as a “masterful” (Publishers Weekly) writer who consistently offers “ferocious storytelling that makes you think and feel” (The Listener) and whose fiction evokes “Breaking Bad reworked by the Coen Brothers” (Kirkus Reviews), Paul Cleave takes us down a cleverly twisted path to determine the fine line between an author and his characters, between fact and fiction.

I was completely torn over the facts of this book. Trust No One is a guessing game from the very beginning. The book has a very just title. Jerry is either a murderer with a conscience, or not, he can’t remember. Let’s go over the facts: Jerry Grey is a crime writer who […]

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