29 08, 2016

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas Mullen

By | Monday, August 29, 2016|12 Comments

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas MullenDarktown by Thomas Mullen
Published by Simon and Schuster on September 13th 2016
Pages: 384
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, Thrillers, Crime, African American
ARC provided by BEA 2016, Simon & Schuster

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In the tradition of our most acclaimed suspense writers, the author of The Last Town on Earth delivers a riveting and elegant police procedural set in Atlanta, a ripped-from-the-headlines depiction of a world on the cusp of great change involving race relations, city politics, and police corruption.

Responding from pressure on high, the Atlanta police department is forced to hire its first black officers in 1948. The newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers and their authority is limited: They can’t arrest white suspects; they can’t drive a squad car; they can’t even use the police headquarters and must instead operate out of the basement of a gym.

When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man turns up fatally beaten, no one seems to care except for Boggs and Smith, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds. Pressured from all sides, they will risk their jobs, the trust the community has put in them, and even their own safety to investigate her death. Their efforts bring them up against an old-school cop, Dunlow, who has long run the neighborhood like his own, and Dunlow’s young partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines.

Set in the post-war, pre-civil rights South, and evoking the socially resonant and morally complex crime novels of Dennis Lehane, and Walter Mosley, Darktown is a vivid, smart, intricately plotted crime saga that explores the timely issues of race, law enforcement, and the uneven scales of justice.

This is such a moving piece of fictionalized American history. In 1948 the first black officers are hired in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Racial tensions are still very high and although the city appoints these officers to patrol over their own streets they have very little power; no patrol cars (no radios […]

13 06, 2016

Review: BRITT-MARIE WAS HERE by Fredrik Backman

By | Monday, June 13, 2016|4 Comments

Review: BRITT-MARIE WAS HERE by Fredrik BackmanBritt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman
Published by Simon and Schuster on May 3rd 2016
Pages: 336
Genres: Fiction, General, Humorous, Literary
Hardcover provided by Atria Books, BEA 2016

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The bestselling author of A Man Called Ove and My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry returns with an irresistible novel about finding love and second chances in the most unlikely of places.
Britt-Marie can’t stand mess. A disorganized cutlery drawer ranks high on her list of unforgivable sins. She begins her day at 6 a.m., because only lunatics wake up later than that. And she is not passive-aggressive. Not in the least. It's just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention. She is not one to judge others—no matter how ill-mannered, unkempt, or morally suspect they might be.
But hidden inside the socially awkward, fussy busybody is a woman who has more imagination,bigger dreams, and a warmer heart that anyone around her realizes.
When Britt-Marie walks out on her cheating husband and has to fend for herself in the miserable backwater town of Borg—of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it—she is more than a little unprepared. Employed as the caretaker of a soon-to-be demolished recreation center, the fastidious Britt-Marie has to cope with muddy floors, unruly children, and a (literal) rat for a roommate. She finds herself being drawn into the daily doings of her fellow citizens, an odd assortment of miscreants, drunkards, layabouts—and a handsome local policeman whose romantic attentions to Britt-Marie are as unmistakable as they are unwanted. Most alarming of all, she’s given the impossible task of leading the supremely untalented children’s soccer team to victory. In this small town of big-hearted misfits, can Britt-Marie find a place where she truly belongs?
Funny and moving, observant and humane, Britt-Marie Was Here celebrates the unexpected friendships that change us forever, and the power of even the gentlest of spirits to make the world a better place.

This was a delight to read. Britt-Marie is such a funny character. She reminds me of Amelia Bedelia from my childhood reading. I am sure she would be horrified to hear that. 63 year old Britt-Marie takes things quite literally and doesn’t understand sarcasm. She doesn’t have a real sense of humor and […]

12 02, 2016

Review: HE WILL BE MY RUIN by K.A. Tucker

By | Friday, February 12, 2016|8 Comments

This book was a suspenseful page turner. Upon finding out her best friend committed suicide, Maggie goes to her home to deal with her estate. Maggie and Celine come from different worlds but their past has kept them close. While packing up her art, Maggie finds Celine’s diaries. She discovers that Celine was […]

1 08, 2015

TRUST NO ONE by Paul Cleave

By | Saturday, August 1, 2015|10 Comments

TRUST NO ONE by Paul CleaveTrust No One by Paul Cleave
Published by Atria Books on August 4th 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Fiction, Thrillers, General, Mystery & Detective, Crime
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via NetGalley

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In the exciting new psychological thriller by the Edgar-nominated author of Joe Victim, a famous crime writer struggles to differentiate between his own reality and the frightening plot lines he’s created for the page.

Jerry Grey is known to most of the world by his crime writing pseudonym, Henry Cutter—a name that has been keeping readers at the edge of their seats for more than a decade. Recently diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s at the age of forty-nine, Jerry’s crime writing days are coming to an end. His twelve books tell stories of brutal murders committed by bad men, of a world out of balance, of victims finding the darkest forms of justice. As his dementia begins to break down the wall between his life and the lives of the characters he has created, Jerry confesses his worst secret: The stories are real. He knows this because he committed the crimes. Those close to him, including the nurses at the care home where he now lives, insist that it is all in his head, that his memory is being toyed with and manipulated by his unfortunate disease. But if that were true, then why are so many bad things happening? Why are people dying?

Hailed by critics as a “masterful” (Publishers Weekly) writer who consistently offers “ferocious storytelling that makes you think and feel” (The Listener) and whose fiction evokes “Breaking Bad reworked by the Coen Brothers” (Kirkus Reviews), Paul Cleave takes us down a cleverly twisted path to determine the fine line between an author and his characters, between fact and fiction.

I was completely torn over the facts of this book. Trust No One is a guessing game from the very beginning. The book has a very just title. Jerry is either a murderer with a conscience, or not, he can’t remember. Let’s go over the facts: Jerry Grey is a crime writer who […]

25 07, 2015

Win a SIGNED copy of Christine Carbo’s THE WILD INSIDE!

By | Saturday, July 25, 2015|0 Comments

Win a SIGNED copy of Christine Carbo’s THE WILD INSIDE!The Wild Inside by Christine Carbo
Published by Simon and Schuster on June 16th 2015
Pages: 416
Genres: Fiction, Thrillers, Suspense, Crime, Mystery & Detective, General

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A haunting crime novel set in Glacier National Park about a man who finds himself at odds with the dark heart of the wild—and the even darker heart of human nature.

It was a clear night in Glacier National Park. Fourteen-year-old Ted Systead and his father were camping beneath the rugged peaks and starlit skies when something unimaginable happened: a grizzly bear attacked Ted’s father and dragged him to his death.

Now, twenty years later, as Special Agent for the Department of the Interior, Ted gets called back to investigate a crime that mirrors the horror of that night. Except this time, the victim was tied to a tree before the mauling. Ted teams up with one of the park officers—a man named Monty, whose pleasant exterior masks an all-too-vivid knowledge of the hazardous terrain surrounding them. Residents of the area turn out to be suspicious of outsiders and less than forthcoming. Their intimate connection to the wild forces them to confront nature, and their fellow man, with equal measures of reverence and ruthlessness.

As the case progresses with no clear answers, more than human life is at stake—including that of the majestic creature responsible for the attack. Ted’s search for the truth ends up leading him deeper into the wilderness than he ever imagined, on the trail of a killer, until he reaches a shocking and unexpected personal conclusion. As intriguing and alluring as bestselling crime novels by C.J. Box, Louise Penny, and William Kent Krueger, as atmospheric and evocative as the nature writing of John Krakauer and Cheryl Strayed, The Wild Inside is a gripping debut novel about the perilous, unforgiving intersection between man and nature.

Want to win a copy of Christine Carbo’s latest gripping thriller The Wild Inside? Then today’s your lucky day! Enter the giveaway using the Rafflecopter widget below. But hurry! The contest ends on 8/13. Editorial Reviews “…stays in your mind long after you’ve put the book down. I’m still thinking about it. Prepare […]

13 06, 2015

THE TRUTH AND OTHER LIES by Sascha Arango

By | Saturday, June 13, 2015|11 Comments

THE TRUTH AND OTHER LIES by Sascha ArangoThe Truth and Other Lies by Sascha Arango
Published by Atria Books on June 23rd 2015
Pages: 256
Genres: Fiction, General, Literary, Suspense, Thrillers
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via NetGalley

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Dark, witty, and suspenseful, this literary crime thriller reminiscent of The Dinner and The Silent Wife follows a famous author whose wife—the brains behind his success—meets an untimely death, leaving him to deal with the consequences.“Evil is a matter of opinion…” On the surface, Henry Hayden seems like someone you could like, or even admire. A famous bestselling author who appears a modest everyman. A loving, devoted husband even though he could have any woman he desires. A generous friend and coworker. But Henry Hayden is a construction, a mask. His past is a secret, his methods more so. No one besides him and his wife know that she is the actual writer of the novels that made him famous. For most of Henry’s life, it hasn’t been a problem. But when his hidden-in-plain-sight mistress becomes pregnant and his carefully constructed facade is about to crumble, he tries to find a permanent solution, only to make a terrible mistake. Now not only are the police after Henry, but his past—which he has painstakingly kept hidden—threatens to catch up with him as well. Henry is an ingenious man and he works out an ingenious plan. He weaves lies, truths, and half-truths into a story that might help him survive. But bit by bit the noose still tightens. Smart, sardonic, and compulsively readable, here is the story of a man whose cunning allows him to evade the consequences of his every action, even when he’s standing on the edge of the abyss.

The title doesn’t seem to make sense, but The Truth and Other Lies is perfect for this book. This book was a total mess, but in all the right ways. The characters in this book were seriously twisted. So I really enjoyed this story and read the whole thing in one day. Henry […]

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