29 08, 2016

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas Mullen

By | Monday, August 29, 2016|12 Comments

Review: DARKTOWN by Thomas MullenDarktown by Thomas Mullen
Published by Simon and Schuster on September 13th 2016
Pages: 384
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, Thrillers, Crime, African American
ARC provided by BEA 2016, Simon & Schuster

AmazonBook Depository

In the tradition of our most acclaimed suspense writers, the author of The Last Town on Earth delivers a riveting and elegant police procedural set in Atlanta, a ripped-from-the-headlines depiction of a world on the cusp of great change involving race relations, city politics, and police corruption.

Responding from pressure on high, the Atlanta police department is forced to hire its first black officers in 1948. The newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers and their authority is limited: They can’t arrest white suspects; they can’t drive a squad car; they can’t even use the police headquarters and must instead operate out of the basement of a gym.

When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man turns up fatally beaten, no one seems to care except for Boggs and Smith, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds. Pressured from all sides, they will risk their jobs, the trust the community has put in them, and even their own safety to investigate her death. Their efforts bring them up against an old-school cop, Dunlow, who has long run the neighborhood like his own, and Dunlow’s young partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines.

Set in the post-war, pre-civil rights South, and evoking the socially resonant and morally complex crime novels of Dennis Lehane, and Walter Mosley, Darktown is a vivid, smart, intricately plotted crime saga that explores the timely issues of race, law enforcement, and the uneven scales of justice.

This is such a moving piece of fictionalized American history. In 1948 the first black officers are hired in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Racial tensions are still very high and although the city appoints these officers to patrol over their own streets they have very little power; no patrol cars (no radios […]

28 08, 2015

THE DROWNED BOY by Karin Fossum

By | Friday, August 28, 2015|2 Comments

THE DROWNED BOY by Karin FossumThe Drowned Boy by Karin Fossum
Series: Inspector Konrad Sejer #11
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on August 25th, 2015
Pages: 240
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, International Mystery & Crime, Thrillers, Crime
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via Edelweiss

AmazonB&NAudibleBook Depository

A new addition to the captivating Inspector Sejer series, the first sinceThe Caller, from Norway's finest crime writer
Carmen and Nicolai failed to resuscitate their son, Tommy, after finding him floating in their backyard pond. When Inspector Skarre arrives on the scene, Carmen reports that Tommy, a healthy toddler with Down syndrome, wandered into the garden while Nicolai was working in the basement and she was cleaning the house. Skarre senses something is off with Carmen's story and consults his trusted colleague, the famed Inspector Sejer. An autopsy reveals Tommy's lungs to be full of soap.
When Sejer and Skarre revisit the couple, Carmen, an epileptic, changes her story, confessing that she'd been knocked unconscious by a seizure while bathing Tommy. When she came to, she found him drowned in the tub and, horrified and frightened, threw him into the pond.
But Skarre and Sejer's doubt is not appeased and the case is reopened. What more could Carmen be hiding? And what lengths will she take to cover her guilt? As Carmen's own family starts to doubt her, Skarre and Sejer work to find the truth.

This story is a bit sad. The prologue tried to put me in a funk as it describes what it is like for someone to drown. The Drowned Boy had some really unlikable characters and a few good guys. This book had me really just hoping for justice for little Tommy. The synopsis […]

19 05, 2015

LITTLE BLACK LIES by Sharon Bolton

By | Tuesday, May 19, 2015|14 Comments

LITTLE BLACK LIES by Sharon BoltonLittle Black Lies by Sharon Bolton
Published by Macmillan, St. Martin's Press on May 19th 2015
Pages: 368
Genres: Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Police Procedural, Suspense, Thrillers, Women Sleuths
eARC provided by Copy provided by publisher via NetGalley

AmazonB&NAudibleBook Depository

In such a small community as the Falkland Islands, a missing child is unheard of. In such a dangerous landscape it can only be a terrible tragedy, surely...When another child goes missing, and then a third, it's no longer possible to believe that their deaths were accidental, and the villagers must admit that there is a murderer among them. Even Catrin Quinn, a damaged woman living a reclusive life after the accidental deaths of her own two sons a few years ago, gets involved in the searches and the speculation.And suddenly, in this wild and beautiful place that generations have called home, no one feels safe and the hysteria begins to rise.But three islanders--Catrin, her childhood best friend, Rachel, and her ex-lover Callum--are hiding terrible secrets. And they have two things in common: all three of them are grieving, and none of them trust anyone, not even themselves.In Little Black Lies, her most shocking and engaging suspense novel to date, Sharon Bolton will keep the reader guessing until the very last page.

This book had my attention right away. The author took me on a guided tour of the Falkland Islands. Little Black Lies exposes the shallows of a little town with a missing child problem. It also delves into the depths of hatred and regret. In the beginning of this story we meet Catrin, […]

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